18 August 2017

ATSOLAR WINS TENDERS TO BUILD INNOVATIVE INSTALLATIONS AT TWO OF DENMARK’S LARGEST UNIVERSITIES

Some of the brightest minds in Denmark at the Technological University of Denmark (DTU) and the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) soon will be supplied with green power from new rooftop installations.

ATsolar has just added two large solar systems to the order book. After a competitive selection process that included major solar suppliers, ATsolar won tenders to build installations for two of Denmark’s leading universities.

At the Technological University of Denmark (DTU) in Lyngby, a suburb of Copenhagen, the task was to deliver 130 kWp capacity at the most competitive price. ATsolar was able to deliver the best bid which consisted of three rooftop systems that together meet the desired capacity.

Winner selection at the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) in Odense, Denmark’s third-largest city on the island of Funen, was based on a different set of criteria. The challenge here was to deliver the most power at a given price, which meant delivering the largest production capacity within the requested ceiling price. After intense competition, ATsolar won the tender and will build a total of 608 kWp, which will be set up on a number of rooftops on university buildings. Approximately ten companies participated in the preliminary qualification process, and these ten were then narrowed down to five in the final bidding round.

The installations at both institutions are expected to be commissioned before the end of 2017.

“At ATsolar, we have had an excellent year, with a strong increase in orders and customers. In long selection processes, we have been able to benefit from the economies of scale that come from belonging to the larger Better Energy group. But our technical innovation also sets us apart from the rest. For the university rooftops, we are installing a new and larger type of solar module – a 72-cell module that achieves a power output of 325 watt instead of the commonly used 60-cell modules. This allows us to utilise the space better and produce more energy over time,” says CEO Nicolai Faaborg Andresen of ATsolar.

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